contact us

Connect with Us

Subscribe to me on YouTube

You are here: DelonixRadar  >  FAQ's

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

  1. What is the best radar detector for me?
  2. Will a radar detector pick up all police cars and bikes?
  3. Will my detector false alarm all the time?
  4. What are the “different radar bands” all about?
  5. Will my radar/laser detector protect me from laser?
  6. Where is the best position to mount my radar detector?
  7. How do I protect myself from laser speed guns?
  8. Are Radar detectors legal in Australia?
  9. Can my radar detector be detected by police?
  10. What are “ticket rebate programs” offered by other companies?
  11. What is the difference between license plate covers or “anti-photo sprays” versus VF1 & VF2 photo jammers?
  12. Do you sell Radar or Laser Jammers?
  13. Do you ship Australia wide?
  14. How can I pay for my purchases?
  15. What is the warranty on your products?
  16. Is my personal information kept private when I register?
  17. Do you have a telephone number or fax number to take orders?

1. What is the best radar detector for me?

This is usually the first question people ask when looking at all the different radar detector models available. Unfortunately, there is no hard and fast rule that works for everyone as it depends on the individual, and their circumstances.  Are radar detectors legal in your state? If not, then consider a FULLY stealth radar detector.  WA drivers should consider a detector that has the best detection range on Multanova Photo Radars, as these photo radars emit a very low power signal that is difficult to detect. If you prefer a custom, hidden design, consider the Bel RX75 model.

 

If I can give you any honest, unbiased advice though, do not waste your money buying a detector brand that isn’t either a Beltronics (Bel), Escort or Valentine for Australia. Or if you don't have the budget for one of these three brands, then a Whistler if you are in WA.

 

Especially DO NOT buy something:

    • Anything from K40,

    • ANYTHING from RMR (Rocky Mountain Radar)

    • Any product that is ludicrously over-priced & claims it is “modded for Australian conditions”.

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

 

2. Will a radar detector pick up all police cars and bikes?

NO. Your radar detector will only pick up police (vehicles) that are transmitting a radar or laser signal.  In other words, unless a policeman is actually using some form of speed measuring device, your detector won’t pick them up. People make the mistake thinking these are a police detector (when they are not). Unfortunately police radar guns aren’t the only things that ‘transmit’ or ‘broadcast’ a signal that is picked up by your detector.

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

 

3. Will my detector false alarm all the time?

Earlier models of radar detectors tended to false alarm all the time, to the point I wanted to through my Cobra Trap-Shooter out the window back in 1993!  These days, radar detectors still false alarm, but the newest models we sell here are the best at minimizing these false alerts.  You see, radar is also used by automatic opening doors, such as those found at petrol stations, shops etc and so these radar signals will often set off a false alert on your detector.  “False alerts” can also be from other radar detectors – older/cheaper models that set your unit off as they drive past your car.  Mobile phones can also set off the sensitive antennas on your detector.  Whenever I’m on the phone, my detector often likes to “join in on the conversation” and say “hello!”  Lastly, there are radar transmitters set up for safety such as road works, on some ambulances and black spot areas.  These will set off your detector, although some detector models can decipher these safety messages as part of the SWS (Safety Warning System) programming.

I find that after a while you get to learn which signals are “real” ones and with the new mute button on the smart cords of the Bel RX65 & Escort X50, it’s simple just to hit the mute when you’re driving through a street of shops etc.  

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

 

4. What are the “different radar bands” all about?

Currently there are two ways police can electronically measure your speed: 

 

Radar & Laser 

 

You need to understand the difference between the three radar bands plus laser to get the most out of your radar detector.  Police radar comes in three different bands, or frequencies.  Similar to different radio stations, different radar bands occur at different frequencies of the spectrum. 

 

X-band’ radar was the first type (frequency) used to measure speeds of vehicles and this can be compared to a radio station on the AM band.  X-band radar is no longer used in Australia (or most parts of the world) so you can essentially turn this feature off with your radar detector.  Some older detectors are not able to turn off X-band, in which case you need to ignore signals on X-band.   

 

K-band’ radar was the second frequency of radar to come out.  K-band is definitely used in Australia, but unfortunately there are many other things that also share this frequency (such as automatic opening doors at petrol stations, shops and banks). K-band has a 5 – 10% chance of being police radar in the city, but up to 95% chance of being police radar on the highway or country roads. 

 

Ka-band’ radar is the latest frequency of radar to come out, and is also used in Australia.  Ka-band was developed as a more accurate, less powered system used by police.  Ka-band has a 90 – 95% chance of being police radar. 

 

Radar works on the Doppler principle, which explained simply is a bit like how a dolphin uses its echo sounder.  Radio waves are transmitted from the radar gun, hit the moving object, and are reflected back to the radar gun.  The gun ‘listens’ to the change in pitch of the radio waves and can determine the speed from this.  Like when of a train blows its whistle as it passes you – you can hear the change in pitch of the whistle, as it goes past. 

 

Laser is completely different to radar.

 

Laser works by calculating the time it takes ‘packets of light’ to be sent from the gun, reflect off the target, and then return to the gun.  The gun calculates several ‘packets of light’ over time to calculate your speed.  A Laser alert on your radar detector has a 95 – 100% chance of being a police gun.

 

Radar bands in Western Australia: 

X-band     - Not Used – Turn this off!!

K-band     - Used by Dash Mounted radar systems on some police car
                 (all highway patrol cars) and
the older hand-held radar guns

Ka-band   - Multanova Speed Cameras

Laser       - Hand-held laser guns (“Ultralyte Marksman 20-20” in WA) 

 

How to interpret these signals:

 

Driving around the CITY, you will get MANY K-band radar signals.  With a bit of experience, you can tend to recognise what is and isn’t police radar (remembering it is probably only a 5% chance of being a police radar in the city).  Particularly if you drive regular routes each day, you’ll learn where the false alerts occur, so getting a K-band alert where you don’t normally on a particular section of road is more likely police radar.  Typically the radar will go off on K-band as you drive past automatic doors, Servos etc.  I always mute the detector during these times, but am also mindful of my speed.  Only once was I caught-out where I muted the detector as I drove past shops – yet a police car was sitting up ahead! (no – I wasn’t speeding and no, didn’t get a ticket). 

 

If you’re on a road that isn’t near shops / buildings, the likelihood of it being police radar is dramatically increased, and on a country road, extremely likely it’s police radar.  Another thing that uses K-band radar on the roads is the SWS (Safety Warning System) being trialled at some road works sites, and ambulances.  The Escort X50 detector will go off on K-band as you approach some of the road works sites on the freeway.  You can see the small white cylinder mounted underneath the sign with a black cable coming out of it.  This is the radar transmitter.  If you have a Bel RX65, it will also speak to you saying “Highway work Crew Ahead” or something similar.  Some Ambulances are also equipped with a SWS transmitter, which will set off K-band and on the Bel units, an “Emergency vehicle in transit” voice alert. 

 

Some other, older radar detector brands also set off the K-band on your radar detector as you drive past a car with one.  This is because the leakage from some old detectors occurs at the same frequency of K-band.  And finally I find my mobile phone also sets off my detector, particularly as I first make a call, just as I hang up, or send/receive sms. 

 

The K-band dash mounted radar on police cars is the easiest one for you to detect with ample warning because the police usually leave the radar ON – blasting down the road as you approach them.  You can detect this signal long before they are close enough to get a reflection signal on your car and hence a reading.  The only exception to this is when they try to be cunning and have it switched off until you are close, in which time they turn the system on and get a reading quickly.  If you are the only car on the road for miles, you may get caught by this, but if there are other cars in front of you (even a km in front), you should detect the police signal as they target the car in front (assuming a straight road). 

Ka-band and Laser alerts should be dealt with seriously and immediately.  This is for reasons two-fold; the chance of it being a police speed measuring device is extremely high, and the time it takes to obtain your speed with these two devices is VERY QUICK.   

Ka-band is used by the Multanova speed cameras in WA, and apparently uses one quarter of one watt of energy; therefore the power output is very small and hard to detect.  Most detectors only give a few seconds of warning (at best) against a Multanova.  For this reason I recommend the Escort X50 detector, as in my experience and research, it has the best warning on Ka band.  If you get a Ka band signal – immediately check your speed, and look out for the black tripod on the side of the road! 

 

Laser, unfortunately, is a very difficult system to avoid a ticket (without a jammer).  Laser operates at the speed of light and usually only takes half a second to acquire your speed – they have your speed before you even hit the brakes!  I have, from personal experience however, had a situation where my radar detector saved me from a fine with a laser gun.  I was driving down the freeway and the detector went off on laser alert.  I immediately checked (slowed) my speed and whilst the detector kept screaming, I saw the police car on the freeway overpass. This would probably be the exception rather than the rule, so I always recommend combining the Valentine One radar detector with the Blinder Laser Jammer. 

 

To summarize: 

X-band    - Turn off

K-band    -  In the city: Probably not radar, but check your speed & mute

                 Out of city: More chance of being a dash mounted system in a police car

Ka-band  - Multanova, act immediately

Laser      - Act immediately, better in combination with a jammer 

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

 

5. Will my radar/laser detector protect me from laser?

No matter what anyone tries to (sell) tell you, a radar detector with a laser detector built in, offers LITTLE or NO PROTECTION against a laser gun.  The time it takes for a laser gun to acquire your speed is approximately ½ a second!  Less time than it takes you to realize you’re being ‘lasered’ and hit the brakes!  Essentially this type of laser detector is actually a “speeding ticket notifier”.  Watch the video to the left to see how fast the laser clocks your speed.

 

There are fundamental differences between radar and laser.  Radar sends out a pulse of electromagnetic (EM) energy, also referred to as RF energy. The radar beam starts out as a small diameter pulse when it leaves the radar gun, but grows quite rapidly as the distance increases from the gun.  At a distance of 300 metres, the radar beam is now 100 metres tall and 200 metres wide! If 6 cars were hit by a radar beam (six vehicles driving down the freeway), 6 pulses would come back to the radar gun, and the radar gun would detect the largest signal of the 6 signals present. 

 

Because the radar beam is so large traveling down the road, a radar detector could be located nearly anyplace around the vehicle, and it will detect the radar signal.  However, laser can only be detected at the point where a laser gun is aimed. This is because a laser beam is much narrower; about 20cm wide at a distance of 200 metres. If a laser gun is aimed at the license plate, the beam is so small, that most times, none of the laser signal would actually “spill over” up to the windshield, where your detector is mounted.  Thus, a radar detector with laser detector mounted on the windscreen would not even detect the laser beam targeted on the license plate (or headlights or bumper for that matter). This means the beam of a laser gun is accurate enough to target a single vehicle out of, let’s say, six vehicles driving down the freeway. The laser gun can target and detect that single vehicle in less than ½ second after the trigger is pulled, while the surrounding vehicles would not detect the laser beam as it passed right beside their vehicle!  Read the test results from SML (Speed Measurement Labs) that confirms these statements. 

 

There are only two real defences against laser guns. The best defence is to instantly jam the laser gun as it attempts to target your vehicle speed.  Whilst there are several products around that claim to do this, we only sell the world’s number one laser jammer, the Blinder X-treme as confirmed by SML (Speed Measurement Labs).  If you don’t have the money to outlay for a Blinder Laser Jammer, the other alternative is to combine your current radar/laser detector with Veil anti-laser paint.  When combined with the added protection of VEIL, your laser detector will actually be useful! VEIL effectively counters laser by reducing the IR signature of the surfaces of your car that the police target with their laser gun.  

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

 

6. Where is the best position to mount my radar detector unit?

This is another highly debated topic.  Unfortunately, again, there is no one simply answer.  The best-case scenario would be that you have one of the remote radar detector kits such as the Bel RX75 remote, as featured in the PRS3-B Prowler Remote package.  This radar detector has the antenna mounted, hidden, in the front grill, and the Visual Display Unit (VDU), hidden in the driver compartment. 

If you have a Blinder laser jammer already installed, or intend to purchase one, then you should mount your detector up high on the windscreen, usually above your rear vision mirror.  If you have a Valentine One radar detector, you should mount it here also. 

 

If you don’t have a Blinder laser jammer then you should mount your radar detector LOW on the windscreen (but not too low).

 

Why?

 

There are two types of technologies that are used to read your speed: Laser and Radar. 

 

Radar is the most common of the two, although police departments everywhere are buying more and more Laser speed guns.  As aforementioned, Radar sends out a pulse of electromagnetic (EM) energy, also referred to as RF energy. The radar beam starts out as a small diameter pulse when it leaves the radar gun, but grows quite rapidly as the distance increases from the gun.  This radar beam can normally penetrate glass, plastic, cardboard and even your body. What radar does have a problem penetrating are metals, including some window tints that have metallic layers or properties. 

 

Laser, on the other hand, is an infrared beam much narrower in diameter; about 20cm wide at a distance of 200 metres.  Because the beam is so narrow, and because it is a beam of light, the beam can be affected (reflected / blocked) by virtually anything you put between the laser gun and the detector. 

 

For this reason, it is advised, that without the use of a laser jammer , you should mount the detector as low as possible, in the middle of the windscreen, but not behind physical objects such as bonnet scoops or windscreen wiper blades.  In this (low) position it gives you the best chance of detecting the pencil thin beam, when it is targeted on your license plate (the primary target for a police laser gun).  If the radar detector is mounted in the center or high on the windscreen, it will be too high to receive any of the “splatter” that may indicate you are being targeted by a police laser gun. 

 

The Valentine One is the exception to this rule, because its high quality optics allow for it to detect off-axis laser that is refracted off the bonnet.  See SML for their results on being able to detect a laser signal, when mounted on the windscreen. 

 

The other two points to consider are rear protection, and also the legality of detectors in your state.  Whilst the chance of detecting a laser gun fired at the rear of your vehicle from a detector mounted anywhere on your windscreen is very slim, you may wish to consider it.  And finally if radar detectors are not legal in your state, you don’t want to have one blatantly obvious by mounting in the middle of the windscreen.  In this case, consider the Bel RX75 remote, as featured in the PRS3-B Prowler Remote package, or the fully stealth Bel Sti detector. 

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

 
7. How do I protect myself from laser speed guns?

There are only two real defences against laser guns. The best defence is to instantly jam the laser gun as it attempts to target your vehicle speed.  Whilst there are several products around that claim to do this, we only sell the world’s number one laser jammer, the Laser Interceptor as confirmed by GOL (Guys of Lidar).  

 

If you don’t have the money to outlay for a Blinder laser jammer, the other alternative is to combine your current radar/laser detector with Veil anti-laser paint.  When combined with the added protection of VEIL, your laser detector will actually be useful! VEIL effectively counters laser by reducing the IR signature of the surfaces of your car that the police target with their laser gun.  LIDAR is an acronym for LIght Detection And Ranging.   A police laser (LIDAR) gun emits a highly focused beam of invisible light, in the near infrared region of light, at 904nm of wavelength, with the beam being around 50cm in diameter at a distance of 300m from the laser gun. Unlike RADAR which determines a vehicle's speed by measuring its Doppler shift, police laser (lidar) calculates speed by observing the changing amount of time is takes to "see" reflected pulses of light over a discreet amount of time. 

 

 

 

After many hours of testing this product with different cars and different police laser guns, the manufacturers determined five primary contributors to police laser's effectiveness. They are (ranked most important to least important)

 

1. Whether or not a license (number) plate is mounted on the front of a vehicle

 

2. The surface-area of headlights, fog lights, and park lights that are positioned on the front of the vehicle.

 

3. The amount of large sections of chrome that are perpendicular to the road facing the front

 

4. The shape of the vehicle - specifically how much of the vehicle is vertical or perpendicular to the road

 

5. Finally the colour of the vehicle (white being the easiest to detect) and type of automotive paint (metallic being the easiest to detect.) 

 

Let's examine each one of these factors which contribute to a vehicle's "visibility" to police laser / lidar. 

 

First

All states in Australia require the use of a front & rear license plate.  These plates are mounted perpendicular to the road surface, thereby acting as a strong reflector of light energy. Furthermore, most current plates are made of “retro-reflective” material which, in effect, magnifies or intensifies the amount of reflected light. We have found that even on black cars that have hidden head lights, such as Porsches, when they have a front-mounted license plate, effective laser targeting range increases as much as four times!  Personalised number plates can often be ordered in “polycarbonate”.  This material offers a much lower reflection than “retro-reflective” plates. 

 

Second

Head/fog lights and park lights are also strong reflectors however they are typically spaced farther apart and since the LIDAR beam only strikes a portion of them at any one time, they are the secondary contributing factor.  

 

Third

Vehicles that have large sections of chrome are easier to target than do vehicles that do not or have complex thin chrome grills with a lot of space in between them.  

 

Fourth

The frontal shape of a vehicle plays a large role in effecting the targeting range of the laser gun. Porsche’s, RX7’s and many sports cars have steeply raked front-ends that have fewer surfaces that are perpendicular to the road. Therefore, cars which are more aerodynamic looking, are likely to be harder to target with laser as these kinds of vehicles reflect laser light away from the gun source. These types of vehicles stand to benefit the most when 'Veiled'. 

 

Fifth

The colour and type of paint contributes to a vehicle's stealth nature. Metallic and/or light cars are easier to target at longer range than darker, non-metallic cars. You may be surprised to see that colour is not higher on the list of importance, however, we have found that all laser guns have improved, since their debut, to the point that the other factors play a more important role in contributing to the overall visual signature to laser. However, darker vehicles will tend to benefit the most when treated with Veil because once the reflected portions are obscured with Veil, the car's colour will be the only source of any remaining reflectivity.  

 

How can I avoid a Laser speeding ticket?

 

Drive a darker car!

 

Seriously, if you happen to own a light-coloured car or truck, consider putting a protective bra on the front. These bras are generally black and will reduce the effective targeting range and maximize you chances to avoid laser speeding tickets. 

 

Buy some clear licence plate covers and coat both sides with veil prior to installing over your number plates.  If these type of clear plates are prohibited in your state, then simply paint two coats directly over your number plate. Paint all reflective objects (head/fog lights, chrome, park lights). 

 

Your car as seen by the laser gun (the red indicates the laser beam)

          Without                                With Veil

 

Another essential device to use is a good radar detector in combination with Veil

 

But for the ultimate protection against police laser, consider using Veil in conjunction with a reliable and proven laser jammer .  These two products used together will transform your car into a F117 Stealth vehicle! 

 

One again we invite you to review the test results from SML (Speed Measurement Labs) which state: 

“Laser Veil performed as advertised reducing the laser capture range from 77% to 32% depending on the reflectivity of the specific vehicle”  

…or for more information on Veil , including FAQ's and videos, see the Manufacture's website.

 

Back to top of FAQ’s


8. Are Radar detectors legal in Australia?

Each state has different laws governing the use of radar detectors.  Here are the links to the road traffic act for each state in alphabetical order: ;

 

AUSTRALIA CAPITAL TERRITORY  

The Bill amends Part X1 of the Principal Act to prohibit the sale, purchase and use of radar detectors and jammers - devices which may be used by motorists to prevent the effective use of radar speed measuring equipment by the police. 

 

New subsection 154G (1) prohibits the use, sale, or purchase of a radar detecting device or radar jamming device. 

 

New subsection 164G (2) makes it an offence for a person to drive a motor vehicle, or cause a motor vehicle to stand on a public street if the vehicle is fitted with or is carrying a radar detecting device or radar

jamming device. This provision is necessary to ensure that a motorist is not able to avoid prosecution by claiming that whilst a radar detector or jammer is fitted or carried in his or her vehicle, the device is not, or has not been, in use. New subsection 164G (3) makes the owner of a motor vehicle which is

driven or stands on a public street or in a public place in contravention of subsection (2) guilty of an offence. 

 

A penalty of $2000 is provided in respect of an offence against new section 164G. 

 

Use of radar speed measuring devices

 

(1) A radar speed measuring device must be used by an operator in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions for the device.

 

(2) The operator must test the device—

 

   (a) at the beginning of each shift of the operator against an approved police speedometer ; and

 

   (b) at the end of each shift of the operator against the speedometer mentioned in paragraph (a); and

 

   (c) if the operator's shift is longer than 9 hours—9 hours after the beginning of the shift against the speedometer  mentioned in paragraph (a).

 

(3) After each test, the device must be found to be accurate within a speedometer of 2 km/h.

 

(4) To remove any doubt, if the device is used at more than 1 place during a shift of the operator, the operator is not required to carry out the checks mentioned in subsection (2) (a) each time the device is activated at a different place.

 

(5) If the device is used by 2 or more operator who are working together during the shift, the tests mentioned in subsection (2) may be carried out by different operator.

 

(6) In this section:

 

"operator" means a person approved to use a traffic offence detection device under section 107 (Approved people—use).

 

NEW SOUTH WALES

4AD Sale, purchase and use of prohibited speed measuring evasion articles:

 

(1) A person must not sell or offer for sale, or purchase, a prohibited speed measuring evasion article.

 

Maximum penalty: 20 penalty units.

 

(2) A person must not drive a motor vehicle, or cause a motor vehicle or trailer to stand, on a road or road related area if a prohibited speed measuring evasion article is fitted or applied to, or carried in, the vehicle.

 

Maximum penalty: 20 penalty units.

 

(3) The owner of a motor vehicle or trailer which is driven or stands on a road or road related area in contravention of subsection (2) is guilty of an offence.

 

Maximum penalty: 20 penalty units.

 

(4) It is a defence to a prosecution for an offence under this section if the defendant satisfies the court that the article concerned was not designed as a prohibited speed measuring evasion article but was designed for another purpose.

 

(5) It is a defence to a prosecution for an offence under subsection (2) or (3) if the defendant satisfies the court that, at the time of the alleged offence:

 

(a) the vehicle was in the course of a journey to a place appointed by a member of the police force, an officer of the Authority or a court, in order to surrender the article, orr

 

(b) the vehicle was the subject of a notice, issued in accordance with the regulations, requiring the owner of the vehicle to remove the article from the vehicle within a specified time and that time had not expired, or

 

(c) the defendant did not know, and in the circumstances could not reasonably be expected to have known, that the article concerned was fitted or applied to, or was being carried in, the vehicle.

 

Traffic Act 1909 - Sect 4AE

 

4AE Surrender and forfeiture of prohibited speed measuring evasion articles

 

(1) A police officer who reasonably believes that:

 

(a) a prohibited speed measuring evasion article is being sold or offered for sale in contravention of section

 

4AD (1), or

 

(b) a motor vehicle or trailer is standing or being driven in contravention of section 4AD (2) because of an article fitted or applied to, or carried in, the vehicle, may require a person in possession of the article to surrender it immediately to the police officer or, in the case of an article fitted or applied to a motor vehicle or trailer and not immediately removable, may by notice in writing served on the owner of the vehicle require the owner to surrender the article within a specified time and in a specified manner to the Commissioner of Police.

 

(2) An officer of the Authority who is authorised in writing by the Authority for the purposes of this section and who finds a prohibited speed measuring evasion article fitted or applied to, or carried in, a motor vehicle or trailer may, by notice in writing served on the owner of the vehicle, require the owner to do either or both of the following:

 

(a) remove the article (if it is fitted to the vehicle),

 

(b) surrender the article within a specified time and in a specified manner to the Commissioner of Police.

 

(3) A person must comply with a requirement under subsection (1) or (2), whether or not he or she is the owner of the article concerned.

Maximum penalty: 20 penalty units.

 

(4) A court which finds an offence under section 4AD or under subsection (3) to have been proven against any person may order that the article concerned, if not already surrendered pursuant to a requirement under this section, be delivered to the Commissioner of Police within a time and in a manner specified by the court.

 

(5) An article surrendered as required under this section is thereby forfeited to the Crown and may be destroyed or otherwise disposed of at the direction of the Commissioner of Police.

 

(6) No liability attaches to any person on account of the surrender by the person, in pursuance of a requirement under this section, of a prohibited speed measuring evasion article of which that person is not the absolute owner

 

Traffic Act, 1909 - Sect 2

 

Definitions: Prohibited speed measuring evasion article means any device or substance that is designed, or apparently designed, to be fitted or applied to, or to be carried in, a motor vehicle or trailer for the purpose of detecting, interfering with, or reducing the effectiveness of, an approved speed measuring device, and includes a radar detecting device and a radar jamming device. Radar detecting device means a device designed or apparently designed to be fitted to or carried in a motor vehicle or trailer for the purpose of detecting electromagnetic radiations from an approved speed measuring device. Radar jamming device means a device designed or apparently designed to be fitted to or carried in a motor vehicle or trailer for the purpose of interfering with the receiving by an approved speed measuring device of reflected electromagnetic radiations.

  

NORTHERN TERRITORY

 

27. Interfering with traffic infringement detection device

 

(1) A person must not unlawfully tamper with, interfere with or cause damage to a traffic infringement detection device.

 

(2) A person must not unlawfully interfere with the operation of a traffic infringement detection device.

 

(3) A person must not drive a vehicle that has in it or on it a device for preventing the effective operation of a traffic infringement detection device.

 

(4) A person must not drive a vehicle that has in it or on it a device for detecting whether a traffic infringement detection device is in operation in the vicinity of the vehicle.

 

(5) A person commits an offence against sub-regulation (3) or (4) whether or not the device in or on the vehicle is in use.

 

(6) If a member of the Police Force believes on reasonable grounds that a person has, or a vehicle is fitted with, a device that is intended to be used in contravention of this regulation, the member may seize the device for the purposes of tendering it in evidence in a prosecution of the person. 

 

(7) If a person is found guilty of an offence against this regulation, the court may order a device seized under sub-regulation (6), or a device used in the commission of the offence, to be forfeited to the Territory.

  

QUEENSLAND

225. (1) A person must not drive a vehicle if the vehicle has in or on it-

 

(a) a device for preventing the effective use of a speed measuring device; or

 

(b) a device for detecting the use of a speed measuring device.

 

Maximum penalty-40 penalty units.

 

225. (2) Subsection (1) applies to a device whether or not the device is operating or in working order.


SOUTH AUSTRALIA

(1) A person must not sell a radar detector or jammer, or store or offer a radar detector or jammer for sale

 

(2) A member of the police force may seize, retain and test any device that he or she has reasonable cause to suspect is a radar detector or jammer.

 

(3) A device seized under this section is forfeited to the Crown if a person is found guilty of or expiates an offence against this Act in relation to the device.

 

(4) A device forfeited pursuant to this section must be disposed of in such manner as the Commissioner of Police directs.

 

(5) In proceedings for an offence against this Act, an allegation in the complaint that a specified device is a radar detector or jammer is proof of the matter so alleged, in the absence of proof to the contrary.


(6) In this section - "radar detector or jammer" includes any device for detecting the use, or preventing the effective use, of a speed measuring device (whether or not the speed measuring device employs radar in its operation).


TASMANIA
,

Division 3 - Horns and radar detectors 

 

Using radar detectors and similar devices 225. 

 

(1) A person must not drive a vehicle if the vehicle has in or on it a device for preventing the effective use of a speed measuring device, or a device for detecting the use of a speed measuring device, unless the person is exempt from this rule under another law of this jurisdiction. 

 

Penalty: Fine not exceeding 10 penalty units. Note: Drive includes be in control of (see the definition in the dictionary. (2) Sub-rule (1) applies whether or not the device is operating or in working order.

 

Note: Under the law of this jurisdiction, radar detectors and similar devices may be subject to confiscation; see rule 354

 

PART 22 - LOCAL ROAD RULES

 

Note 1

 

The rules in this Part are not part of the national scheme. They apply only in Tasmania.

 

Division 1 - Powers of police officers and authorised persons seizure of detection devices

 

354. (1) A police officer or authorised person who has reasonable grounds for believing that a motor vehicle is equipped with a detection device may; (a) enter and search the motor vehicle; and (b) doing as little damage as possible in the circumstances, seize any device that appears to the police officer or authorised person to be a detection device; and (c) cause any device so seized to be tested; and (d) cause any device so seized to be produced in court as evidence in any proceedings under rule 225.

 

Note 1: Authorised person and police officer are defined in the dictionary.

 

Note 2: Rule 225 makes it an offence to drive a vehicle having a detection device.

 

(2) If a person is convicted of an offence under rule 225 the detection device to which the offence relates is forfeited to the Crown.

 

(3) In this rule "detection device" means; (a) a device for preventing the effective use of a speed measuring device; or (b) a device for detecting the use of a speed measuring.

VICTORIA, (Road Safety Act 1986) section74

(1) A person must not own, sell, use or possess a device the sole or principal purpose of which is to prevent the effective use of a prescribed speed measuring device or to detect when a prescribed speed measuring device is being used.

Penalty: 20 penalty units.

(2) A person must, if required to do so by a member of the police force or an officer of the Corporation or an employee in the Department of Infrastructure (being an officer or employee authorised in writing by the Corporation or the Secretary of the Department of Infrastructure, as the case requires, in that behalf), surrender to that member or officer or employee any device referred to in sub-section(1).

Penalty: 5 penalty units.

(3) A court that convicts a person of an offence against sub-section(1) or before which a person is charged with an offence against sub-section (1) of which the person is found guilty or to which the person pleads guilty and in respect of which a conviction is not recorded may order that the device by means of which the offence was committed be forfeited to the Government of Victoria.

(4) All devices forfeited under sub-section (3) must be destroyed or otherwise is posed of as the Chief Commissioner of Police directs. device.

Start of valid time period for this component: 01 Dec 1999. End of valid time period for this component: 29 Nov 2009.

 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Currently there are no laws governing the possession, sale or use of radar detectors or laser detectors. 

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

9. Can my radar detector be detected by police?

YES! Police have electronic units known as radar detector detectors, or RDD’s. These units, manufactured by an Australian company Stealth Micro Systems are designed to detect the local oscillator (lo) leaked frequencies of a radar detector. Read more about RDD’s at Speed Zones.  The only radar detectors on the market that are invisible to ALL radar detector detectors (well OK, the only units that are manufactured by a reputable company and not one that has “modded” from an old Whistler or a new Valentine 1) are the Stealth radar detectors.

 

RDD’s are used by police on the East Coast of Australia, to “sniff out” people using a radar detector. If you want to wish to avoid detection, you could switch off your detector before encountering a police vehicle containing a RDD or by a fully stealth radar detector.

 

Western Australian police don’t use RDD’s as detectors are not illegal to possess or operate.  Just be sure to switch the unit off when you cross the border! 

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

10. What are “ticket rebate programs” offered by other companies?

Rocky Mountain Radar (RMR) offers a "ticket rebate program" to purchasers of its products. It is a nice catch phrase that makes the potential buyer conclude that the product performance must be pretty good to offer such a claim. Is this ticket rebate program just a come-on to convince a novice buyer that the product must be the best thing since sliced bread, or does this claim truly represent the performance of the products, or is it a calculated risk offered by the companies to get customers to buy products?  Here are Ticket Rebate Terms from Rocky Mountain Radar and some, if not all, of its distributors for RMR passive radar jammers:


The following restrictions apply to the ticket rebate program.

  • In order to be eligible for the ticket rebate program, the ticket rebate option must be purchased.

  • The registered owner of the jammer must be the driver.

  • The registered owner must not be going over 15 MPH or 30% over the posted speed limit, whichever is less.

  • The ticket must clearly state "radar" or "laser" and "speeding".

  • The ticket is within one year of the date of purchase and the registered owner has mailed in the registration form.

  • The ticket is given in the United States.

  • The registered owner must be from earth!

 

Either the product works or it doesn't.  Their rebate program makes you jump through a lot of small hoops!!  Why is that necessary? 

 

Most potential customers of Passive Scramblers do not ask what must be provided to get a claim paid after you receive a ticket. Take a look at the details of this so-called ticket rebate program. Notice the fine print about not honoring the ticket rebate if you were caught driving above a certain speed over the posted limit, or above a certain percentage above the posted limit, or if the ticket does not specifically state "radar" or "laser". 

 

Suffice it to say, if this manufacturer can't prove that his products work, and you use them, you WILL get at least one radar/laser ticket if you travel too fast too often. If you do get a rebate of $100, you may have paid $300 for the product, so the manufacturer would still have a good portion of your funds. Are you wondering "then why do they offer this $100 ticket rebate if what they sell does not work?" Well think about it. You sell an item costing perhaps $20.00 for $300.00. If you send the customer back $100, you are still ahead of the game $180.00. 

 

 

There are a number of web companies that sell the Rocky Mountain Radar product lineline.

 

You won't

 

integrity.eburg(dot)com...also called Integrity Distributing (Empire Inc.),
radar-laser-jammers(dot)com...also called Worldwide Electronics Group
best-radar-jammers(dot)com, also known as RDR Enterprises
speedlabs(dot)net...actually tried to emulate SpeedMeasurementLabs
carwaves(dot)com...hard to figure out what company this is
radar-jammers(dot)bizz
007radar(dot)com... these guys have a number of sites for passive stuff
auto-radar-detectors(dot)com
technoscout(dot)com...this is a big time company selling RMR passive stuff
http://support.radioshack.com/support_auto/70132(dot)htm...Radio Shack????  

 

Some of these companies are nationally known and respected including Radio Shack. And what a surprise Radio Shack got recently when they asked Speed Measurement Labs to test the Rocky Mountain Radar scramblers, and all the results were a failure at jamming radar and laser.

 

It is evident to us that these companies do not care enough about their customers to either test or research the products they sell!  

Back to top of FAQ’s


11. What is the difference between license plate covers or “anti-photo sprays” versus active photo jammers?



Passive anti-photo license plate covers, such as Chameleon, Super Protector, etc.; are made of plastic with a lens either designed into the plastic or attached to the plastic cover. The plate is bolted against the license plate and the lens is designed to obscure the alpha-numeric characters at an angle of 20-40 degrees from the side of the road. This is the typical angle that photo cameras are installed on the side of the road, but can also be installed above the road on bridges or poles. The plates will distort the plate characters at all times from the side of the road, or from above the road, but not both. Police do not appreciate this as they drive by your vehicle and are not able to see your plate for a short period of time. In most states, this is called obfuscation; i.e., hiding the plate, and the police will write a ticket in many instances when they see a dark cover or a lens over the plate. When a bright light is pointed at the anti-photo cover as with a camera flash, the distorted characters will not show up in the photo image under normal photo imaging. If an analog picture camera is used these types of anti-photo covers will work great, if you don’t get a ticket for obscuring your plate. If digital imaging is used, as with most technology today, these types of anti-photo plate covers are worthless, as discussed below. ;

 

Photo Sprays, such as Photo Blocker, Photo Fog, Photo Spray (an endless number of product names) are designed to spray (via hand pump or pressurized can) a liquid over the surface of your license plates. 99.999% of the customers do not realize that this type of material is very close to a hair spray product, or is a hair spray product, re-packaged in a new can with a different name. (I wonder what is going through your mind at this point). Liquid chemicals such as this or hair spray, are emitted as a liquid and when the liquid drops contact a surface, (whether hair or a metal plate), the liquid will evaporate, forming millions of ultra-small crystals, which are cubicle in form. When a bright light is pointed at the plate as with a camera flash, the millions of ultra-small crystals on the license plate will cause a very bright reflection to the camera; in effect blinding the camera. 

 

The photo camera’s normal operation is to use radar (sometimes laser) to detect the speed of oncoming vehicles. When detecting a speed greater than the set point of the camera (posted speed limit), the radar will command the camera to trigger at the right moment in time, no matter how fast you are driving, and take a photo of the plate (and the driver, if the camera is set up for oncoming traffic). The image is then sent by email to a processing facility, or the data is stored on some sort of memory device and picked up from time to time by an operator. The images are then compared to a local data base, and a speeding ticket, based on the speed of the vehicle, is mailed to the registrant.  

 

When an image from a license plate protector or photo spray is encountered, the image can be easily inversed using standard digital photo programs to bring out the alpha-numeric characters, and the driver still gets a speeding ticket. So much for the anti-photo plates and anti-photo sprays. 

 

Active photo jammers come in two designs, both using a flash detector and bright flash to either blind the camera image or blind the plate from the camera image. One active Photo Jammer version will flash back at the camera to blind the camera and any body who happens to be looking in the direction of the active photo jammer. We feel this type of active photo jammer is a hazard to other drivers. The 2nd type of active Photo Jammer that detects the bright flash, but rather than flash back at the camera, the flash is directed over the license plate, causing the alpha-numeric characters to become totally white, no matter what color the characters are. Because this flash is directed downward, it achieves the jamming in a safe manner, and blinds only the license plate from the camera image. In either case of active photo jamming, the plate is always visible to any police who happen to drive by. When the active photo jammer detects a flash, the photo camera gets a picture of bright white light, thus it does not matter if the image is inversed electronically; since the image is white, the inverse of white is black. All the camera will get is white in normal imaging mode, or black in an inverse image mode, thus a speeding ticket cannot be mailed to the registrant of the vehicle using an active Photo Radar Jammer product. If you use the license plate covers, or a photo spray liquid, it may be a lot less expensive, but you are only giving your money away, since the operators know they need only push a button to inverse the photo image to get the license plate image. Cheap thrills! You still get a ticket for $29.95, the typical cost of the spray or license plate cover; and you will likely get a ticket when using anti-photo plate covers anyway. If you want safe, superb protection against photo radar traps. 

 

Back to top of FAQ’s


12. Do you sell Radar or Laser Jammers?

Your most important question in purchasing a jammer should be "does it work?"

First, the bad news:
you have seen them advertised on other websites and many magazines: the passive radar/laser jammers (also known as radar scramblers).  Some passive jammers are Phantom, Phantom II, Phantom III and The Black Widow.

Passive Jammers DO NOT WORK!
These jammers are manufactured by a company named Rocky Mountain Radar. We test many of their units and we have yet to find one that works as advertised.

Know What to Avoid
before you purchase such a passive jammer, consider reading the Jamming Testing Report by Radar Roy first to find out why we do not sell and/or recommend them.

Active Radar Jammers - Not Much Improvement
You may have also seen the active radar jammers with the name of Phantom RCD XP or The Scorpion. These do work to a limited degree.

Active radar jammers like those named above, only jam X, K and the new digital bands. These units have no effect what so ever on Ka band. Today over 60% of traffic enforcement operate in the K band range, 20% in the X band range and 20% in the Ka band range. (USA statistics)

Before you go out and spend your H.A.R.D. earned money you may want to find out what the prevalent radar bands used by the police departments in your area. Now the good news!!
More and more police departments across the world are moving up to traffic laser enforcement. The reasons are that these guns are more precise in targeting speed violators and they are not easily detectable by today's radar/laser detectors.

In addition, many insurance companies are now purchasing these laser guns for the police departments with the hopes of reducing accidents (that's their story, we feel it is to raise revenue by catching more speeders then increasing their insurance premiums for the next five years).

However, they are easily jammed!

Most Effective Laser Jammers
The best laser jammer in the world is the
Laser Interceptor active laser jammer.

Jammers and the Law (USA)
One question that we are frequently asked "isn't jamming laser against federal law?" No it isn't. Laser is a beam of light and laser is regulated by the FDA. Currently there is no federal law prohibiting you by owning what amounts to "a brighter beam of light then the cops have".  

Laser Interceptor... The Best! In our testing the Laser Interceptor came in #1 as the best laser jammer on the market today.

The
Laser Interceptor consistently jammed 100% of all the laser guns put against it.

This unit easily installs in the front grill of your vehicle. The downside of this unit is that it does not offer any rear protection unless you purchase the
Quad head Laser Interceptor
; which offers two additional laser transceivers to install on the rear of your vehicle. (if you own a motorcycle you can place one jammer to the front and one jammer to the rear for 360 degree protection. This is not advisable for cars or trucks).

However, police officers are trained to focus the laser beam first on the front license plate, then the front headlamp if they do not get a reading. Therefore, over 98% of all laser is targeted the front area of your vehicle.

Back to top of FAQ’s

 

13. Do you ship Worldwide?

Yes, we ship internationally, however you should check your local laws on the use of radar detectors and similar products.  Some countries and/or states use only the words “radar detector” and “radar jammer” in their legislation. Therefore a laser detector or laser jammer doesn’t fall under their current legislation.

There are also some brands we cannot ship to certain counties (such as Beltronics to Australia / New Zealand)...please check individual product shipping descriptions.

Back to top of FAQ’s

 

14. How can I pay for my purchases?

For secure online purchases, you may use paypal, Master card or Visa Card.  Alternatively if you'd prefer not to purchase over the Internet, we offer Fax ordering, Phone Ordering, Direct Deposit, or payment by cheque.  West Australian customers may also pay Cash on Delivery.

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

 

15. What is the warranty on your products?

All our products sold on Delonix are new (not re-manufactured) and come with the full manufacturers warranty - unlike what you'll buy off Ebay!  Sure you may save a few dollars buying off Ebay, but you might be getting a refurbished product (off eBay), and either way, what happens if the product is faulty?

We know the industry, we are an authorised Australian distributor and know what works and what doesn't. We don’t sell every radar detector and radar jammer available, only the best.  If for any reason you are unhappy with your purchase, you may return it within 7 days for refund - See our policies page for more information or contact us.  

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

 

16. Is my personal information kept private when I register?

Absolutely! Click here to read our privacy policy. 

 

Back to top of FAQ’s

 

17. Do you have a telephone number or fax number to take orders?

Yes! If you'd prefer to telephone us - no problem!  We take Visa and Master Card orders over the phone or fax, Direct Deposit, Paypal, Cheques or Internet orders. Please click on Contact Us for our telephone numbers.